Haaretz, Oct. 7, 2016

 

much of this new building activity is taking place in locations like Ariel, far away from Israel’s internationally recognized border or any other likely future border. As such, it appears aimed at blocking any future evacuation of the settlements.

“We are seeing dramatic growth in the past year in two particular settlements — Ariel and Efrat — which are especially problematic because, on the one hand, they are considered part of the so-called ‘consensus’ in Israel. But, on the other, they are situated in places where it would be harder to pull out from in the event of a peace agreement,” said Hagit Ofran, director of the Settlement Watch project at Peace Now [....]

This trend is confirmed by Bimkom, an organization of Israeli human rights activists in the fields of planning and architecture. “What we’re seeing lately is lots of building activity going on far away from the Green Line and away from the big settlement blocs,” said Alon Cohen, who monitors developments in the West Bank for the organization.